The Art of Science: A Natural History of Ideas

Author(s): Richard Hamblyn

Science

Science. Does the word fill you with excitement, or dread, or something in between? Science and the art of science writing can, and should, be something to get excited about. The extracts featured in this anthology span centuries and continents, but are connected by their authors' desire to understand, explain and enrich the world. The Art of Science is not a book about great scientific theories, complicated equations or grand old men and women in their laboratories; instead, it's about the places we draw our inspiration from; about daily routines and sudden flashes of insight; about dedication, and sometimes desperation; and the small moments, questions, quests, clashes, doubts and delights that ultimately make us human. From Galileo to Lewis Carroll, from Humphry Davy to Charles Darwin, from Marie Curie to Stephen Jay Gould, from rust to snowflakes, from the first use of the word 'scientist' to the first computer, from why the sea is salty to Newtonian physics 'for the ladies', The Art of Science is a book about people, which is to say it's a book about passion, politics, and poetry. Above all, though, it's a book about the good that science, and scientific thinking, can and does do.


Product Information

Richard Hamblyn is the author of The Invention of Clouds, which won the 2002 Los Angeles Times Book Prize and was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize, Terra: Tales of the Earth, a study of natural disasters, Data Soliloquies, co-written with the digital artist Martin John Callanan, and The Cloud Book, published in association with the Met Office. He teaches creative writing at Birkbeck College, University of London.

General Fields

  • : 9780330490757
  • : Pan Macmillan
  • : Picador
  • : 0.79
  • : September 2011
  • : 234mm X 153mm
  • : United Kingdom
  • : December 2011
  • : books

Special Fields

  • : Richard Hamblyn
  • : Hardback
  • : 12-Nov
  • : English
  • : 509.22
  • : 400